Dan Storck Kicks Off Campaign for Mount Vernon District Supervisor

Adam Ebbin, Dan Storck, Joana Garcia, Karen Corbett Sanders
Adam Ebbin, Dan Storck, Joana Garcia, Karen Corbett Sanders

Storck gathered with supporters at Hallowing Point Pavilion in Mason Neck.

Patch.com

Mary Ann Barton

Dan Storck kicked off his campaign last weekend to represent the Mount Vernon District on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, according to his campaign.

Storck gathered with supporters at Hallowing Point Pavilion in Mason Neck.

The campaign thanked the following people for helping with the campaign kick-off: Anne and Linwood Gorham, Tim and Barbara Rizer, Kimberly and John Kern, Christine and Christopher Morin, Kim and John Pionzio, Diana and Jim York, Missy and Keith Salisbury, and Carol Corso and Kim Winnard

Campaign Kickoff at Mason Neck

Thank you to everyone who was able to attend and support this weekend’s past kickoff event. It was a fun event at Hallowing Point Pavilion in Mason Neck. A special thank you as well to our host committee whose efforts were vital to the success of the event: Anne and Linwood Gorham, Tim and Barbara Rizer, Kimberly and John Kern, Christine and Christopher Morin, Kim and John Pionzio, Diana and Jim York, Missy and Keith Salisbury, and Carol Corso and Kim Winnard.

If you have any photos from the event that you’d like to share, please email the campaign at info@danstorck.org.

Lorton and Mount Vernon: Bennett Joins Former Opponent Storck’s Supervisor Campaign

Mount Vernon Gazette

Tim Peterson

She didn’t beat him and now she’s joining him. Nearly two months since Dan Storck won the Democratic primary election for Mount Vernon District supervisor, his campaign announced former opposing candidate Candice Bennett has joined up as the Storck team’s director of communications.

Storck, who represents Mount Vernon on the Fairfax County school board, is running to fill the seat being left by supervisor Gerry Hyland (D-Mount Vernon), who has said he will be retiring after serving since 1988.

“I am joining Dan’s campaign because I believe that as supervisor, Dan will work on the issues that are most important to our district,” Bennett said in a statement, “including empowering our seniors to age in place, revitalizing the historic Route 1 corridor and increasing educational opportunities by fully funding our schools.”

Bennett is based in Lorton, where she runs a multiple-industry research and consulting firm.

In a statement, Storck said Bennett “brings an important voice and perspective to our communications.”

“It was a hard-fought primary and I think it shows our district that the Democratic Party is united to win this race in November,” he added.

Debate Set for Candidates for Mount Vernon District Supervisor Seat

Republican Jane Gandee to debate Democrat Daniel Storck. Winner in November will represent area on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors.

Lorton Patch

Mary Ann Barton

Mount Vernon District Supervisor candidates Dan Storck and Jane Gandee will debate the issues Sept. 16 at Sherwood Regional Library.

The debate is set for Wednesday, Sept. 16 at 7 p.m. and is sponsored by the League of Women Voters. The library is located at 2501 Sherwood Hall Lane.

Gandee, a Republican, has raised $52,988 ($33,323 from the candidate and $9,937 from her company, ServiceMaster); Storck, a Democrat, has raised $115,079 ($92,510 from the candidate).

In other campaign news, the Dan Storck for Supervisor campaign announced today that former Democratic candidate Candice Bennett has joined the campaign as director of Communications.

The seat is currently held by Gerry Hyland, a Democrat who is retiring after serving on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors 1988. The Mount Vernon district includes Lorton, Belvoir, Newington and Huntington.

“I am joining Dan’s campaign because I believe that as supervisor, Dan will work on the issues that are most important to our district, including empowering our seniors to age in place, revitalizing the historic Route 1 corridor and increasing educational opportunities by fully funding our schools,” said Candice Bennett. “During the primary I had the chance to get to know Dan and I know he will carry on Supervisor Hyland’s legacy. ”

A successful small business owner, Bennett has operated a research and consulting firm based in Lorton for more than 10 years that provides high-level strategy to a wide range of clients in a variety of industries, including consumer electronics, financial services, academia, hospitality, industry associations and professional membership organizations. Prior to starting her firm, Bennett was a director at Penn, Schoen and Berland, a Democratic polling firm in Washington, D.C., where she worked with a wide range of clients, including the Democratic National Committee and Tim Kaine for Lieutenant Governor.

“I’m thrilled that Candice has joined our campaign as she brings an important voice and perspective to our communications,” said Storck. “It was a hard-fought primary, and I think it shows our district that the Democratic Party is united to win this race in November. I look forward to working with her.”

Dan Storck won the Democratic Primary on June 9. He has lived with his wife and children in the Mount Vernon District of Fairfax County for more than 25 years. He has served the community as a successful healthcare entrepreneur, the president of three non-profit community development organizations, a youth coach and for the past 12 years, representing the Mount Vernon District on the Fairfax County School Board.

Officials Reiterate Need for Timeline Speedup

Mount Vernon Voice

Steve Hunt

2040.

Twenty-five years to wait for a two-stop extension of the Yellow Line south along Richmond Highway to Beacon Hill and Hybla Valley?

That’s the estimated completion date as it stands today — and that doesn’t sit well with Del. Scott Surovell (D-44th) who, with state Sen. Toddy Puller (D-36th) secured funding for the Route 1 Multi-Modal Transit Study for Route 1 which calls for bus rapid transit along the corridor and Metro rail extension later.

“We’re basically saying that’s ridiculous,” Surovell told the Voice prior to a joint press conference Tuesday morning at the Huntington Metro Station with Mount Vernon Supervisor Gerry Hyland, Dan Storck, candidate for Mount Vernon supervisor and Paul Krizek, candidate for the 44th District House seat.

Surovell added that Fairfax County has endorsed the study recommendations; however, the board has also urged officials to expedite the construction of the extension of the Yellow Line.

Last October, Surovell and Hyland, as members of the executive steering committee of the Route 1 Multimodal Alternatives Analysis, signed a resolution in support of the plan which includes widening the highway from four to six lanes where necessary, creating a continuous facility for pedestrians and bicyclists along the 15-mile corridor and implementing a median-running bus rapid transit system from Huntington to Route 123 in Woodbridge and a 3-mile Metrorail Yellow Line extension from Huntington to Hybla Valley “as expeditiously as possible.”

To facilitate the expedition of the Yellow Line extension, in May the board of supervisors initiated Embark Richmond Highway made up of Mount Vernon planning commissioner Earl Flanagan, Lee planning commissioner James Migliaccio, and members of the Mount Vernon and Lee districts, including members of the Southeast Development Corporation board of directors, to act as an advisory group.

Surovell said they will use the committee’s recommendations, expected to be issued this fall, as a catalyst to get decision makers to speed up the timetable.

Speaking at the news conference, Surovell said when he was first running for state delegate six years ago, he promised that improving Richmond Highway would be his top priority.

With the final report issued earlier this year, Surovell described it as a blueprint for the Richmond Highway corridor for the next 30 years which should be used to take advantage of the corridor’s attributes, such as being among the highest elevation places in the county and describing it as “prime real estate” only seven miles from Washington, DC, and the gateway to Virginia.

Population growth is coming to northern Virginia and Surovell said the question is whether new residents will live on former farm fields in Stafford and Fauquier counties, or in places such as the Richmond Highway corridor with increased density and mass transit.

Krizek, who grew up in Mount Vernon and recalls when it was a sleepy, bedroom community where people commuted into Washington, DC, to work.

Today, he says, “folks are coming to Mount Vernon for jobs,” citing the fact that more people now work at Fort Belvoir than at the Pentagon.

“It’s time,” he said, noting that Mount Vernon and Lee residents have been waiting patiently for decades for significant investment in the corridor. “People cannot wait another 20 or 30 years.”

Storck said that public investment in infrastructure begets private investment and the time has come to make that public investment in the Richmond Highway corridor.

He noted that investment has been made in other areas in the county and northern Virginia such as Tysons Corner, Alexandria and Arlington.

“Now it’s our turn,” Storck said, promising to be “a fighter to get our fair share that’s long overdue.”

Hyland, who is not running for office, said he will be a “candidate” in support of Surovell, Storck and Krizek as they “carry the ball forward” in the months and years to come.

Hyland, as Mount Vernon supervisor for 28 years, knows that traffic is deadlocked on the corridor and transit solutions desperately needed today.

Moving the timetable forward is “absolutely essential” and the money necessary for it is justified, he said.

According to the executive brief issued in February, the timeline calls for a four-phase approach to implementation.

The bus rapid transit system, roadway widening, and pedestrian/bicycle facilities will be implemented during the first three phases through 2032, with the Metrorail extension in the 2040 timeframe.

The recommended projects would require funding from a wide range of sources including local, regional, state and federal funds, with the total cost for the first three phases — bus rapid transit all the way from Huntington to Woodbridge.

The Metrorail Phase IV is estimated to cost $1.46 billion.

Surovell believes by seeking out funding now from those variety of sources, including the U.S. Army which, through Base Realignment and Closure action, has brought tens of thousands more employees to the post, its possible to have the Metro line extension completed in 15 years, not 25.

“It can be done a whole lot faster than what’s been suggested,” Surovell said. “A whole lot faster.”